3CT Presents Future Café: Intimacy
May
3
5:00 PM17:00

3CT Presents Future Café: Intimacy

What is a Future Café? It is an experiment. It is an open-ended conversation. It is a chance to brainstorm and share ideas without evaluation. It is a place to eat cake. Based loosely on both 3CT’s successful Book Salon series and the global Death Café movement, the objective of this new recurring event is to provide opportunity and space for undergraduates to collectively imagine utopian possibilities and long-term futures. 

Under the auspices of the Materializing the Future research project, Professors Shannon Dawdy and Bill Brown facilitate the Future Café, a venue where students in the College can creatively and collaboratively imagine possibilities for the long term. 

"For additional information and links, go to: http://voices.uchicago.edu/futurecafe/ .

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1918: The Constitutional Anomalies of Insurgent Universality” by Massimiliano Tomba
May
7
12:00 PM12:00

1918: The Constitutional Anomalies of Insurgent Universality” by Massimiliano Tomba

Massimiliano Tomba will be presenting his paper "1918: The Constitutional Anomalies of Insurgent Universality” at the Political Theory Workshop. 

Massimiliano Tomba is a professor at the History of Consciousness Department in UC Santa Cruz. His new project, “Insurgent Universality” is about the plurality of revolutions that intersected in the French Revolution, which he considers from the perspective of the insurgency of the slaves in the Haitian revolution and the insurgencies of women and the poor in France. He makes a case for an alternative tradition of “insurgent universality” that challenges the dominant conception of universalism in several ways. “Insurgent universality” constitutes a different tradition that, on the one side, holds together political experiments, such as the Paris Commune and the first Soviet Constitution, both of which question the statist-juridical conception of citizenship, and on the other side, allows us to think of different pathways of modernization, which bridge Western and non-Western juridical, political and economic conceptions.

 

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3CT Presents Future Café: Cities
May
14
5:00 PM17:00

3CT Presents Future Café: Cities

What is a Future Café? It is an experiment. It is an open-ended conversation. It is a chance to brainstorm and share ideas without evaluation. It is a place to eat cake. Based loosely on both 3CT’s successful Book Salon series and the global Death Café movement, the objective of this new recurring event is to provide opportunity and space for undergraduates to collectively imagine utopian possibilities and long-term futures. 

Under the auspices of the Materializing the Future research project, Professors Shannon Dawdy and Bill Brown facilitate the Future Café, a venue where students in the College can creatively and collaboratively imagine possibilities for the long term. 

This Future Cafe will coincide with the symposium: Materializing the Future: Urban Spaces.

"For additional information and links, go to: http://voices.uchicago.edu/futurecafe/ .

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Climate Change and Asia
May
24
9:30 AM09:30

Climate Change and Asia

Asia is central to the causes, responses, and implications of climate change. This symposium explores climate policy and environmental challenges across East, Southeast, and South Asia, from water politics and renewable energy to sustainable tourism in the Anthropocene. 

Sponsored by: 

"Studies in Climate Change: The Limits of the Numerical"

a Mellon Foundation Project at the Franke Institute for the Humanities

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The Soup Is On: A Conference on Experimental Critical Practice
Jun
1
to Jun 2

The Soup Is On: A Conference on Experimental Critical Practice

This conference launches Berlant and Stewart's The Hundreds (DUKE, 2018), their forthcoming experiment in form, attention, and generative worlding. Apart from Stewart and Berlant, every Soup is On experimenter wrote an index for the book, reorganizing it in their own register and mode. Their collaborative effort aspires to jumpstart a community conversation about what critical thinking can look like, sound like, and be for.

RSVP to our EVENTBRITE
RSVP is not required to attend and there is no formal registration process. It is recommended to RSVP as seating is limited. 

Check out our Experiments, Workshops & more!
For more information, please visit the conference website.
 

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Tone, Tact and Meaning in Ethnographic and Documentary Film
Apr
12
6:30 PM18:30

Tone, Tact and Meaning in Ethnographic and Documentary Film

Michael M.J. Fischer (MIT) and Thorsten Trimpop (School of the Art Institute of Chicago)   

Thorsten Trimpop’s film, Furusato 古里, is a human-scale portrait of a small town in Japan’s nuclear exclusion zone. It premiered at the International Documentary Film Festival Leipzig (DOK Leipzig) where it won the grand prize, the Golden Dove. 

Currently, it's touring film festivals worldwide and is in theatrical release in 52 cities in Germany and Austria. 

The film will be shown, followed by a discussion with the filmmaker (Trimpop) and anthropologist (Fischer). Trimpop and Fischer co-taught a class at MIT last year exploring ethnographic filmmaking and particularly the fast-changing partnership between technologies and ways of seeing. 

Food will be served in Cobb Hall 402 at 6:30pm

Screening and lecture will begin at 7:00pm in the Film Studies Center (Cobb Hall 306)

Fischer's interest is in broadening the tools of ethnographic “writing” (including both epistemological frames from other media, and incorporating other media for ethnographic and social theory purposes). 

Furusato 古里 translates, roughly, as “home”, but also more poignantly evokes the landscapes both of our origin and birth, but also our death.  

Such “structures of feeling” are themselves of ethnographic interest, as are the transnational structures of feeling that motivate a filmmaker to take up the years that it takes to produce such a film.    

Furusato 古里 reveals the unusual relationship between a landscape and its inhabitants. Over the course of a thousand years, the exuberant nature of Japan’s eastern coast has become interwoven in the lives of its people. Here, the earth is sacred—but now, it is tainted with the invisible danger of radiation. For those who have decided to stay, the rural scene surrounding the crippled Fukushima Daiishi nuclear power plant remains the place they call home – their furusato, the first landscape they experience as children and the last one they will see before they die. A monumental portrait of wounded nature and the unsung costs of progress, the film illuminates the struggle of daily existence amidst the greatest nuclear disaster of our time. Here, no one measures in half-lives. This is about eternity.

 

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Beyond Satire: What Lubitsch, Genet, and Claudel Can Tell Us About Ideology Today.
Apr
10
5:00 PM17:00

Beyond Satire: What Lubitsch, Genet, and Claudel Can Tell Us About Ideology Today.

Please join us for a talk with Aaron Schuster on contemporary satire and ideology: 

Can there still be political comedy when politics has itself become an unsurpassable comedy, a self-satire to beat all satires? Today we ought to reverse Marx's famous formula: instead of history as the farcical repetition of what previously possessed tragic dignity,  contemporary reality presents itself as "the first time as farce, the second time as tragedy." This is the lesson of Jean Genet's play The Balcony, a subversive political comedy that takes place almost entirely inside a fancy brothel. What begins as a seemingly inconsequential sex farce ends as a deadly serious political tragedy when the clownish troupe of brothel-goers effectively seize the reigns of power.

In this talk, I will focus on three artworks, Ernst Lubitsch's film To Be or Not To Be, Genet's The Balcony, and Paul Claudel's play The Hostage, to outline some of the ways that ideology works today.

Aaron Schuster is a philosopher and writer, based in Amsterdam. He is the author of The Trouble with Pleasure: Deleuze and Psychoanalysis (MIT Press, 2016). He is currently working on two book projects: Spasm: A Philosophy of Tickling, forthcoming from Cabinet Books, and, together with William Mazzarella and Eric Santner, Sovereignty Inc.: Three Inquiries in Politics and Enjoyment, to appear in the Trios Series of the University of Chicago Press. In 2016 he was a visiting professor at the University of Chicago.

 

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The Digital and the Analog
Apr
9
4:30 PM16:30

The Digital and the Analog

 

Please join us for a talk with Alexander Galloway and Ivan Ascher on analogicity, digitality, and information theory. Galloway and Ascher will be discussing the ways in which analogicity has defined itself as an alternative to digitality - how "pure" information always encounters its supplement (or opposite) in the form of real materiality (bitcoin's consumption of energy being one prime example).

Alexander R. Galloway is a writer and computer programer working on issues in philosophy, technology, and theories of mediation. He is author of several books on digital media and critical theory, including The Interface Effect (Polity, 2012). His collaboration with Eugene Thacker and McKenzie Wark, Excommunication: Three Inquiries in Media and Mediation, has recently been published by the University of Chicago Press. With Jason E. Smith, Galloway co-translated the Tiqqun book Introduction to Civil War(Semiotext[e], 2010). For ten years he worked with RSG on Carnivore, Kriegspiel and other software projects. Galloway's newest project is a monograph on the work of François Laruelle, published in October 2014.

Ivan Ascher teaches social and political theory at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. His current research is on the continued relevance of Karl Marx and Max Weber for a critique of contemporary capitalism. He is also developing a new research project on the university in the age of neoliberalism.

Please RSVP via Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-digital-and-the-analog-tickets-44195454795

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3CT Presents Future Café: Transportation
Apr
5
5:00 PM17:00

3CT Presents Future Café: Transportation

What is a Future Café? It is an experiment. It is an open-ended conversation. It is a chance to brainstorm and share ideas without evaluation. It is a place to eat cake. Based loosely on both 3CT’s successful Book Salon series and the global Death Café movement, the objective of this new recurring event is to provide opportunity and space for undergraduates to collectively imagine utopian possibilities and long-term futures. 

Under the auspices of the Materializing the Future research project, Professors Shannon Dawdy and Bill Brown facilitate the Future Café, a venue where students in the College can creatively and collaboratively imagine possibilities for the long term. 

"For additional information and links, go to: http://voices.uchicago.edu/futurecafe/ .

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3CT Presents Future Café: Post-Capitalism and Labor
Mar
1
5:00 PM17:00

3CT Presents Future Café: Post-Capitalism and Labor

What is a Future Café? It is an experiment. It is an open-ended conversation. It is a chance to brainstorm and share ideas without evaluation. It is a place to eat cake. Based loosely on both 3CT’s successful Book Salon series and the global Death Café movement, the objective of this new recurring event is to provide opportunity and space for undergraduates to collectively imagine utopian possibilities and long-term futures. 

Under the auspices of the Materializing the Future research project, Professors Shannon Dawdy and Bill Brown facilitate the Future Café, a venue where students in the College can creatively and collaboratively imagine possibilities for the long term. 

"For additional information and links, go to: http://voices.uchicago.edu/futurecafe/ .

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Terrell Carver, Marx & Engels's "German ideology" update: fabrications receptions, questions
Feb
28
5:30 PM17:30

Terrell Carver, Marx & Engels's "German ideology" update: fabrications receptions, questions

This illustrated talk presents an overview of very recent historical and analytical research on Marx and Engels, arguing that The German Ideology “never took place,” considering how and why activists become “thinkers,” and exploring what difference a practice-based contextual approach might make to the discourses through which political theory is defined in scholarly and other communities.

Terrell Carver is Professor of Political Theory at the University of Bristol, UK. He has published widely on Marx, Engels and Marxisms, and also on sex, gender and sexualities. He is co-general editor of the Palgrave Macmillan book series "Marx, Engels, and Marxisms" and co-editor of the journal Contemporary Political Theory. Currently he is Program co-chair for the 25th IPSA World Congress of Political Science in Brisbane,July 21-25, 2018.

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Thomas Dodman, What Nostalgia Was: War, Empire, and the Time of a Deadly Emotion
Feb
27
6:00 PM18:00

Thomas Dodman, What Nostalgia Was: War, Empire, and the Time of a Deadly Emotion

Nostalgia today is seen as essentially benign, a wistful longing for the past. This wasn't always the case, however: from the late seventeenth century through the end of the nineteenth, nostalgia denoted a form of homesickness so extreme that it could sometimes be deadly.

What Nostalgia Was unearths that history. Thomas Dodman begins his story in Basel, where a nineteen-year-old medical student invented the new diagnosis, modeled on prevailing notions of melancholy. From there, Dodman traces its spread through the European republic of letters and into Napoleon's armies, as French soldiers far from home were diagnosed and treated for the disease. Nostalgia then gradually transformed from a medical term to a more expansive cultural concept, one that encompassed Romantic notions of the aesthetic pleasure of suffering. But the decisive shift toward its contemporary meaning occurred in the colonies, where Frenchmen worried about racial and cultural mixing came to view moderate homesickness as salutary. An afterword reflects on how the history of nostalgia can help us understand the transformations of the modern world, rounding out a surprising, fascinating tour through the history of a durable idea.


Thomas Dodman is Assistant Professor in the Department of French and the College at Columbia University. He is the author of What Nostalgia Was: War, Empire and the Time of a Deadly Emotion(Chicago, 2018) and is currently co-editing a global history of war for the Éditions du Seuil. A cultural and intellectual historian of modern France, Dr.Dodman received his PhD from the University of Chicago and was a Mellon Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. He previously taught at Boston College and currently serves as associate editor for Emotion Review.

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Future Cafe and Doc Films Present: Afrofuturism
Feb
26
5:30 PM17:30

Future Cafe and Doc Films Present: Afrofuturism

Future Cafe: 5:30-6:45 PM

Sankofa: 7 - 9:10 PM; $5.00 at the door (cash or card)

3CT's Future Cafe and Doc Films are pleased to contribute their collaborative effort to Doc Film's Afrofuturism series. Please join us for a discussion moderated by Professor Shannon Dawdy and Doc Films Series Programmer Jola Idowu, followed by a screening of Sankofa. Light refreshments will be provided. 

Afrofuturism has been a part of the African and African Diaspora experience in all generations from slavery, to the Great Migration, Civil Rights, and today. The desire for a better and more equitable future that offers a site of healing for both the past and the present has been an integral part of the Black experience. In celebration of the end to our Afrofuturist series, Doc Films and 3CT present FutureCafe.2: Afrofuturism. Join us as we host a conversation on imagining a Black future in an uncertain present and what defines a Black Future. The conversation will be moderated by Professor Shannon Dawdy, Anthropology, and "The Future Is Black: Afrofuturism in Film" programmer, Jola Idowu. After the conversation, guests are free to transition to Ida Noyes Theater for a screening of a seminal film of Afrofuturism, Sankofa by Haile Gerima.

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3CT Presents the next Future Café: Climate Change
Feb
1
4:30 PM16:30

3CT Presents the next Future Café: Climate Change

The next meeting of the Future Café will take place Thursday, February 1st, from 4:30-6:00 pm in Wilder House with the student-selected topic of long-term human responses to Climate Change. Participants are invited to check out the following optional media pieces that can be used to launch the discussion:

1) "Six Ways We Can Adapt to Climate Change" 

2) Snowpiercer (Bong Joon-Ho, 2013)

All undergraduates are welcome to participate. Registration is highly encouraged as seating is limited. RSVP via Eventbrite  or on Facebook

What is a Future Café? It is an experiment. It is an open-ended conversation. It is a chance to brainstorm and share ideas without evaluation. It is a place to eat cake. Based loosely on both 3CT’s successful Book Salon series and the global Death Café movement, the objective of this new recurring event is to provide opportunity and space for undergraduates to collectively imagine utopian possibilities and long-term futures. 

Under the auspices of the Materializing the Future research project, Professors Shannon Dawdy and Bill Brown facilitate the Future Café, a venue where students in the College can creatively and collaboratively imagine possibilities for the long term. 

"For additional information and links, go to: http://voices.uchicago.edu/futurecafe/ .

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"Where have all the leaders gone?" with Michael Hardt
Jan
18
4:30 PM16:30

"Where have all the leaders gone?" with Michael Hardt

We continue to witness each year the eruption of “leaderless” social movements.  From North Africa and the Middle East to Europe, the Americas, and East Asia, movements have left journalists, political analysts, police forces, and governments disoriented and perplexed.  Activists too have struggled to understand and evaluate the power and effectiveness of horizontal movements.  Why have the movements, which express the needs and desires of so many, not been able to achieve lasting change and a more just society?  Many assume that if only social movements could find new leaders they would return to their earlier glory and be able to sustain and achieve projects of social transformation and liberation.  Where, they ask, are the new Martin Luther King Jr.s, Rudi Dutschkes, Patrice Lumumbas, and Stephen Bikos?  Where have all the leaders gone? 

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Future Café
Nov
29
4:30 PM16:30

Future Café

Please join 3CT’s new venture into the future. Under the auspices of the Materializing the Future research project, Professors Shannon Dawdy and Bill Brown will facilitate the Future Café, a venue where students in the College can creatively and collaboratively imagine possibilities for the long term. 

What is a Future Café? It is an experiment. It is an open-ended conversation. It is a chance to brainstorm and share ideas without evaluation. It is a place to eat cake. Based loosely on both 3CT’s successful Book Salon series and the global Death Café movement, the objective of this new recurring event is to provide opportunity and space for undergraduates to collectively imagine utopian possibilities and long-term futures. What sort of ideas appeal in the present moment? What projects are already underway? What is neo-futurism, or futurology? What is the role of imagination in shaping politics, the environment, and social life? How might radical futures be brought into being? Each café will have a general theme linked to an optional discussion piece such as a podcast, a piece of fiction or journalism, a film, or a museum exhibit.

Future Café will take place on the first Thursday of every month from 4:30-6:00 PM in Wilder House.

February 1

March 1 

April 5 

May 3

June 7 

 All undergraduates are welcome to participate. Registration is highly encouraged as seating is limited. RSVP at the Eventbrite link here or on Facebook.

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New Book Salon: Pharmocracy
Nov
20
6:00 PM18:00

New Book Salon: Pharmocracy

Please join us for the first New Book Salon of the academic year. Kaushik Sunder Rajan will be discussing his latest publication, Pharmocracy


Continuing his pioneering theoretical explorations into the relationships among biosciences, the market, and political economy, Rajan introduces the concept of pharmocracy to explain the structure and operation of the global hegemony of the multinational pharmaceutical industry. He reveals pharmocracy's logic in two case studies from contemporary India: the controversial introduction of an HPV vaccine in 2010, and the Indian Patent Office's denial of a patent for an anticancer drug in 2006 and ensuing legal battles. In each instance health was appropriated by capital and transformed from an embodied state of well-being into an abstract category made subject to capital's interests. These cases demonstrate the precarious situation in which pharmocracy places democracy, as India's accommodation of global pharmaceutical regulatory frameworks pits the interests of its citizens against those of international capital. Sunder Rajan's insights into this dynamic make clear the high stakes of pharmocracy's intersection with health, politics, and democracy.

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Not Reading: 2017 English Graduate Conference
Nov
2
to Nov 3

Not Reading: 2017 English Graduate Conference

The 2017 Conference of the English Department Graduate Students at the University of Chicago invites students, faculty, and local (not) readers to a conference on the relevance of "not reading" to the cultures, practices, and institutions of literature. Our conference begins with a simple contention: every act of reading entails an implicit decision not to read something else—and, indeed, not to engage in an activity other than reading. How can an acknowledgement of this fact help us rethink some of the most pressing issues of literary study today, including new interpretive methodologies, canonicity, patterns of publication, the work of reading, lost texts, the archive, or the politics of what we (don't) read?

Conference Website: https://voices.uchicago.edu/notreadinguofc/

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Co-Sponsored Event: Round table discussion with Françoise Vergés
Oct
19
6:00 PM18:00

Co-Sponsored Event: Round table discussion with Françoise Vergés

  • Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts, Terrace Seminar Room (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

 

Presented by Logan Center Exhibitions in partnership with the Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory (3CT).

Drawing on her writings and extensive research on postcoloniality, racism and the work of Pan-Africanist scholars such as Aimé Césaire, post-colonial theorist Françoise Vergés leads a discussion on the origins of pan-Africanism and considers its contemporary articulations in the culture and politics of the African diaspora.  

This event is part of the multiyear research project and public program, The Ties that Bind: Waves of Pan-Africanism in Contemporary Art and Society. The first convening, Returns, presents a series of public programs that takes place at the Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts from October 13 – 15, and October 19, 2017. For more information, please visit the website

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Conspiracy/Theory Conference
Oct
6
to Oct 7

Conspiracy/Theory Conference

Please join us for a two-day conference entitled Conspiracy/Theory where we'll be discussing the theoretical in conspiracy and the conspiratorial in critical theory.  Participants will explore the conditions for knowing in a world where there is often too much information but not of the right kind to judge evidence, ascertain the nature of truth claims, or resolve issues of agency and intent.  And, we'll be examining how and when intuition, experience, and judgement become marked as either conspiratorial or theoretical --trying to understand the elective affinities between conspiracy and theory while appreciating the seductions of each.

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CANCELLED - Dialogue:  DeSigning Praxis: DeSigning Globality // Shiben Banerji + Nora Akawi
May
17
4:30 PM16:30

CANCELLED - Dialogue: DeSigning Praxis: DeSigning Globality // Shiben Banerji + Nora Akawi

For our fourth episode of the DeSigning Praxis dialogue series, two architectural theorists, teachers and practitioners -- Shiben Banerji from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC), and Nora Akawi from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) -- will explore the relationship between Design and Globality. In so doing, Banerji and Akawi will add to the DeSigning Praxis’s ongoing consideration of Design as a world-imagining, and thus world making or “worlding” enterprise -- a social practice that makes the cosmological into the praxiological.

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Lecture:  The Limits of Sovereignty as Responsibility // Adom Getachew
May
11
5:00 PM17:00

Lecture: The Limits of Sovereignty as Responsibility // Adom Getachew

This Theorizing the Present lecture argues that the redefinition of sovereignty as responsibility dangerously reduces sovereignty to a functional role and casts the relationship between a state and its citizens in a paternalistic form. The functionalism and paternalism of sovereignty as responsibility renders it conditional and reproduce structures of international hierarchy. In response to these problems, Getachew calls for a return to and rethinking of sovereignty as autonomy.

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Dialogue: DeSigning Praxis: Design as Political Economy // Alejandra Azuero + Francesco Marullo
May
8
5:00 PM17:00

Dialogue: DeSigning Praxis: Design as Political Economy // Alejandra Azuero + Francesco Marullo

The fourth installment of the DeSigning Praxis series brings together a lawyer/anthropologist -- Alejandra Azuero -- and architect and architecture theorist -- Francesco Marullo, to discuss the coming into being of a world of total design as a historical process of alignment of epistemologies, practices, and theories of design with modes for producing economic and legal order.

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Co-Sponsored Event:  Civil war: discord within
Apr
28
9:00 AM09:00

Co-Sponsored Event: Civil war: discord within

This symposium asks what are the stakes of naming violent domestic conflict civil war rather than revolution, or the Greek stasis, or tumult, sedition, insurgency, or guerilla warfare? At what point do we call conflicts civil wars and when do we stop doing so? The recent disturbance in Syria, for instance, goes by civil war in the Western media, but it raged for a full year before earning that appellation. Arabists, however, prefer to characterize it as a proxy war between Saudi Arabia and Iran and therefore feel civil war is off the mark—a terminological-conceptual controversy that hearkens back at least to the “Spanish Civil War.” Some might choose to designate the Syrian conflict rather a religious war within Islam. Depending on one’s stakes, the name of civil war can legitimate one side or condemn all of the warring parties.

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 Lecture: Excavating contemporary capitalism: toward a critique of extraction writ large // Sandro Mezzadra
Apr
19
6:00 PM18:00

Lecture: Excavating contemporary capitalism: toward a critique of extraction writ large // Sandro Mezzadra

  • Franke Institute for the Humanities (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Beginning with the question of globalization's persistence in the age of Trump, Mezzadra will attempt to shed light on the specific “rationality,” or “logic” underlying operations of capital in strategically important “sectors” of economic activity – such as extraction, logistics, and finance. He examines the relationship of such operative logics with the nation state form and argues for an expended notion of extraction and its impact upon contemporary capitalism before turning to a set of questions regarding a politics capable of effectively confronting this increasingly extractive capitalism and opening up new vistas of liberation and life beyond the rule of capital.

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Grad Student Workshop: On Operations and Optionality / Sandro Mezzadra + Robert Meister
Apr
14
4:00 PM16:00

Grad Student Workshop: On Operations and Optionality / Sandro Mezzadra + Robert Meister

Political theorists Robert Meister and Sandro Mezzadra have uniquely advanced the study of capitalism and politics, but their considerable bodies of work have not often been placed in direct conversation with each other. 

Beginning with the “operations of capital” (Mezzadra/Neilson 2015) and the “option form of value” (Meister 2016), this graduate student designed workshop proposes to initiate this conversation by asking how these analytics resonate and differ in their shared aim to further our understanding of the abstract and material nature of global technologies of capital accumulation, and by inquiring into the political practices highlighted in and perspectives afforded by each approach. 

 

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Lecture: The President’s Body and Other Missing Matters: “Conspiracy Culture” in Cyprus // Lisa Davis
Apr
13
5:00 PM17:00

Lecture: The President’s Body and Other Missing Matters: “Conspiracy Culture” in Cyprus // Lisa Davis

  • Franke Institute for the Humanities (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This lecture begins with the theft of the corpse of controversial Cypriot president, Tassos Papadopoulos, from his grave in a south Nicosia cemetery in December 2009.  Working through the intense public speculation surrounding the theft, Davis examines the intersections between “conspiracy theory” and social theory on epistemological and ethical grounds, and asks what kinds of knowledge are enabled and what kinds of politics are empowered by “conspiracy theories” as well as by their debunking.

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Lecture:  In the shadow of de-industrialization // Rosalind C. Morris
Feb
24
3:30 PM15:30

Lecture: In the shadow of de-industrialization // Rosalind C. Morris

Roz Morris explores the withdrawal of electricity in the de-industrializing spaces of South Africa's gold economy, many of which are are subject to the state only via the threat of violence.  Here, popular tribunals nonetheless try to mimic the sovereign state and economic life attempts a rationalized form.  What conspires here - what brings together otherwise distinct bodies (of discourse and power), Morris argues - is not so much theory as forms of existence that are determined and determining in the mode of resemblance.   

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