Worlding, Writing--Trauma and the Aesthetics of Life series: Bad News
Feb
21
5:00 PM17:00

Worlding, Writing--Trauma and the Aesthetics of Life series: Bad News

  • Franke Institute for the Humanities (map)
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Bad News is an award-winning installation work that combines Wizard of Oz techniques and live improvisational acting into an emotionally charged one-on-one experience whose story and setting is uniquely generated, for each performance, by a computer simulation. In the summer of 1979, a resident in a computer-generated American small town has died alone at home, and a mortician's assistant—the player—is tasked with tracking down and notifying the next of kin. To do this, the player navigates the richly simulated town to interact with its residents, who are each played live by a professional actor. Throughout gameplay, an unseen wizard listens in remotely to manage the unfolding experience via live coding and discreet communication with the actor. Writing about the piece for Rolling Stone, Steven T. Wright remarked, "This marvel of procedural performance can only be played by a lucky few, and that's a crying shame." Through its peculiar bricolage of human and machine performance, Bad News meditates on the trauma of losing a life and, ultimately, a world.
 
In this special public performance, attendees will listen in on a live playthrough (in the style of a radio play) and receive a behind-the-scenes, commentated look at the AI technology and Wizard of Oz techniques that underpin the experience. Attendees will also be encouraged to ask questions and call out story ideas that can be communicated to the actor, who may integrate them into the experience as it is unfolding. A Q&A session will follow the performance.

TEAM BIO

Bad News is a project of James Ryan, Ben Samuel, and Adam Summerville, who created the piece as PhD students in the Expressive Intelligence Studio at UC Santa Cruz, a research lab dedicated to exploring the artistic potential of artificial intelligence. Since its inception in 2015, Bad News has been performed internationally, at venues including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Slamdance, and IndieCade, where it won the Audience Choice award. Adam Summerville, who is now an assistant professor in Computer Science at Cal Poly Pamona, serves as guide on the project: he assists the player in the lead-up to her performance and explains the piece to exhibition passersby. Adjacently to this project, Summerville is a rising scholar in the area of artificial intelligence for videogames, where his work has received attention from The Guardian and SlateBen Samuel, now an assistant professor in Computer Science at the University of New Orleans, leverages over a decade of improvisational experience to serve as the project's sole actor. In this vein, his past work includes a starring role in Hulu's first original scripted series, Battleground, which earned him praise from the New York Times. James Ryan, who is now a research scientist at the historic computing firm BBN Technologies, serves as wizard on the project—this entails managing each performance, behind the scenes, as it is unfolding. His work in expressive computer simulation has been featured in The GuardianVice, and on BBC Radio. 

Check out the Facebook and Eventbrite pages for this event. RSVP is recommended as seating is limited, but not required.

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Conspiracy/Theory, Feeling the Plot: Writing into the Affects, Atmospheres, and Poetics of Conspiracy, Susan Lepselter
Feb
26
12:00 PM12:00

Conspiracy/Theory, Feeling the Plot: Writing into the Affects, Atmospheres, and Poetics of Conspiracy, Susan Lepselter

How does one write about a conspiracy theory without explaining it away?

This event is a hands-on writing workshop. We'll explore ways to represent and think about the occult, elusive object of a plot.

Check out the Facebook and Eventbrite pages for this event. RSVP is recommended as seating is limited, but not required.

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3CT Presents Future Café - Kinship
Feb
27
5:30 PM17:30

3CT Presents Future Café - Kinship

What is a Future Café? It is an experiment. It is an open-ended conversation. It is a chance to brainstorm and share ideas without evaluation. It is a place to eat cake. Based loosely on both 3CT’s successful Book Salon series and the global Death Café movement, the objective of this new recurring event is to provide opportunity and space for undergraduates to collectively imagine utopian possibilities and long-term futures. 

Under the auspices of the Materializing the Future research project, Professors Shannon Dawdy and Bill Brown facilitate the Future Café, a venue where students in the College can creatively and collaboratively imagine possibilities for the long term. 

Check out the Facebook page for this event. RSVPs not required.

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Worlding, Writing--Trauma and the Aesthetics of Life series: Illness Narratives as Health Activism: Telling Stories about Precarity to Save the ACA with Beza Merid
Mar
7
5:00 PM17:00

Worlding, Writing--Trauma and the Aesthetics of Life series: Illness Narratives as Health Activism: Telling Stories about Precarity to Save the ACA with Beza Merid

At a moment when public policies and social programs face political disfavor, how can social movements use emotional performance about vulnerability to change the discourse around a divisive topic? The Affordable Care Act (ACA), which expanded health insurance coverage to millions of Americans, is one such case. As patients, caregivers, and health activists fight to resist the repeal of the ACA, they use intimate illness accounts to demonstrate the extreme effects of rescinding the investment in equity and justice they say the ACA represents.

One such effort emerges from the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), a left-leaning labor union that organizes around a number of social justice issues. SEIU’s “Fight For Our Health” campaign frames its arguments through performances of what I call “health insurance precarity.” These narratives, shared in person during protest actions and online by the campaign, situate the resolution of this precarity as a social, rather than individual, concern. This talk engages questions about how precarious patients facing economic and health risks make claims to biological citizenship and social belonging in order to pressure public opinion and the law. It gives a more general account, too, of the role the current health media landscape plays in this negotiation.

ABOUT BEZA MERID

Beza Merid (Ph.D., New York University) is an LSA Collegiate Fellow in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, where he researches the cultural and political dimensions of illness. In particular, his scholarship examines how experiences of patienthood are mediated in the contemporary health media landscape, how patients and caregivers find ways to survive when adequate health insurance is inaccessible, and the persistence of racial disparities in heart disease and stroke.

Merid is currently working on his first book project, which examines how stand-up comedy and stand-up comedians participate in the production of biomedical knowledge, and gathering material for his second book project, which examines how patients and caregivers participate in knowledge production about racial disparities in heart disease and stroke.

Check out the Facebook and Eventbrite pages for this event. RSVP is recommended as seating is limited, but not required.

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Capitalism and Social Theory: a Conference in Memory of Moishe Postone
Apr
12
to Apr 13

Capitalism and Social Theory: a Conference in Memory of Moishe Postone

  • Regenstein Library Room 122 (map)
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Moishe Postone, who died in March of last year, was a preeminent interpreter of Marx’s critical theory, a thinker of international renown, and a major intellectual presence at the University of Chicago, where he was the Thomas E. Donnelley Professor in the History Department and the College. Sponsored by the Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory, where he served as co-director, the conference brings together Moishe’s friends, colleagues, and intellectual collaborators. We will reflect on his ideas and further explore the broad range of topics that his thinking and writing have illuminated. We hope to conjure up something of Moishe’s much regretted presence – his incisiveness, his breadth of interests, his political and moral passions, his wit, and his unending practice of constructive critique.

RSVP is encouraged, but not required. View this event on Eventbrite and Facebook.

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3CT Presents Future Café - Consciousness
Apr
30
5:30 PM17:30

3CT Presents Future Café - Consciousness

What is a Future Café? It is an experiment. It is an open-ended conversation. It is a chance to brainstorm and share ideas without evaluation. It is a place to eat cake. Based loosely on both 3CT’s successful Book Salon series and the global Death Café movement, the objective of this new recurring event is to provide opportunity and space for undergraduates to collectively imagine utopian possibilities and long-term futures. 

Under the auspices of the Materializing the Future research project, Professors Shannon Dawdy and Bill Brown facilitate the Future Café, a venue where students in the College can creatively and collaboratively imagine possibilities for the long term. 

Check out the Facebook page for this event. RSVPs not required.

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Materializing the Future, Speculative Design: Post-petroleum Utopias
May
31
9:00 AM09:00

Materializing the Future, Speculative Design: Post-petroleum Utopias

Speculative Design is a cyborg practice that harkens back to past futurist movements, insisting on a moveable spectrum between art and radical social science. The term embraces diverse practitioners motivated to open up the imagination around “wicked problems” (Dunne and Raby 2013). Perhaps no problem seems quite so wicked in the contemporary moment as climate change and human dependency on petroleum. What would it mean to imagine a world without oil and its derivatives? What sort of leaps are both necessary and possible? What possibilities does a multi-generational perspective open up – a future beyond our own lifetimes?

Check out the Facebook event. RSVP not required, but recommended as seating is limited.

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Co-sponsored event: The Legacy of Moishe Postone Conference
Feb
15
to Feb 16

Co-sponsored event: The Legacy of Moishe Postone Conference

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The legacy of Moishe Postone: Teacher, Historian, Critical Theorist brings together his students from across the social science and humanities to celebrate and reflect upon his historical, theoretical, and pedagogical work. Moishe’s profound and rigorous social theory illuminates supra-disciplinary questions ranging from capitalism’s historical dynamic to the social, political, and economic crises of the contemporary conjuncture. The conference will elaborate some of the critical methods of potentials of Moishe’s theory.

This conference is generously co-sponsored by the Bernard Weissbourd Memorial Fund, the Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory, the Committee on Japanese Studies at the Center for East Asian Studies, the Franke Institute for the Humanities, the Graduate Council Fund, the International House Global Voices Program, the Joyce Z. and Jacob Greenberg Center for Jewish Studies, the Pozen Family Center for Human Rights, the Society of Fellows in the Liberal Arts, and the Departments of Anthropology, Comparative Human Development, Germanic Studies, and History at the University of Chicago.

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New Book Salon, Worldmaking after Empire by Adom Getachew
Feb
14
6:00 PM18:00

New Book Salon, Worldmaking after Empire by Adom Getachew

Adom Getachew discusses Worldmaking after Empire: The Rise and Fall of Self-Determination. She will be joined in conversation by Christopher Taylor, Darryl Li, and Jennifer Pitts. A Q&A and signing will follow the event.

Presented in partnership with the Seminary Co-Op Bookstore and the Center for International Social Science Research

About the Book: Decolonization revolutionized the international order during the twentieth century. Yet standard histories that present the end of colonialism as an inevitable transition from a world of empires to one of nations—a world in which self-determination was synonymous with nation-building—obscure just how radical this change was. Drawing on the political thought of anticolonial intellectuals and statesmen such as Nnamdi Azikiwe, W.E.B Du Bois, George Padmore, Kwame Nkrumah, Eric Williams, Michael Manley, and Julius Nyerere, this important new account of decolonization reveals the full extent of their unprecedented ambition to remake not only nations but the world.

About the Author: Adom Getachew is Neubauer Family Assistant Professor of Political Science at University of Chicago.

About the Interlocutors: Christopher Taylor is Assistant Professor of English at University of Chicago; Darryl Li is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at University of Chicago.

About the Moderator: Jennifer Pitts is Professor of Political Science at University of Chicago.

Check out the Facebook event HERE.

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CANCELLED: WORLDING, WRITING--TRAUMA AND THE AESTHETICS OF LIFE SERIES: On Death Writing with Vinh Cam
Feb
13
5:30 PM17:30

CANCELLED: WORLDING, WRITING--TRAUMA AND THE AESTHETICS OF LIFE SERIES: On Death Writing with Vinh Cam

Everywhere we look we find testimonies to survival; at the same time, this is the era of the terminal illness memoir. This archive offers a unique history of the present that also revises the biopolitical account of the contemporary U.S. as a “death-denying society.” Yet judged against the genre protocols of autobiographical performance this archive inevitability gets construed with suspicion:“by definition,” life writing scholars remind us, “none of us can…know the shape of [our] end in advance.” But what version of the event, or writing for that matter, is being enforced here? Reading with recent terminal illness memoirs by Christopher Hitchens, Paul Kalanithi and Cory Taylor, my talk reconceives these texts within the frame of "death writing." A “form of death” is emerging next to the survival-form of life and forging an aesthetic with it. This framework refines the biopolitical relation to death, characterized by Michel Foucault as “letting die."

ABOUT VINH CAM

Vinh Cam is a PhD Candidate in the Department of English Language and Literature at University of Chicago.

Check out the Facebook and Eventbrite pages for this event. RSVP is recommended as seating is limited, but not required.

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3CT Presents Future Café - Utopia
Feb
4
5:30 PM17:30

3CT Presents Future Café - Utopia

On Monday, February 4th, share in Future Café’s conversation on the future of utopian thinking. The conversation will be facilitated by College students Veronica Myers and Abigail Kuchnir. Cake will be served. 

All undergraduates are welcome to participate. Hosted by 3CT fellows Shannon Lee Dawdy and Bill Brown. For more information, visit the Facebook event page, or the Voices site. RSVPs are not required.

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Conspiracy/Theory, The Play of Conspiracy in Plato's republic, Demetra Kasimis
Jan
24
4:00 PM16:00

Conspiracy/Theory, The Play of Conspiracy in Plato's republic, Demetra Kasimis

  • 5811 S Kenwood Ave Chicago United States (map)
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Does Plato’s Republic dramatize a conspiracy? Ostensibly, this work of historical fiction revolves around a philosophical question posed at the start about the meaning of justice. This challenge famously incites the characters to design a political regime alternative to the Athenian democracy under which the characters speak. The provided impetus for discussing radical political change is a desire to investigate a political idea rather than a wish to overthrow a political regime for a better one. While this picture of what the Republic is up to is not wrong, it does belong to the narrator, who speaks from a political reality Thucydides describes as highly unstable. Plato stages a collective and clandestine nighttime act to found an alternative regime “in speech” during the years of the Peloponnesian War when suspiciousness was rampant and rumor of conspiratorial acts came to constitute juridical evidence for rounding up citizens. I argue that the Republic makes wide-ranging and curiously under-explored use of this anxious, vicissitudinous atmosphere by troping conspiracy in plain sight. From the narrator’s untrustworthy voice to the setting’s disjointed time, the conversation’s interest in exposing endless connections between concepts to its idealization and unmasking of the workings of a kind of all-knowing “big power,” the Republic plays with conspiracy not to endorse it but to establish a conspiratorial mood. Read in light of these political realities, its rhetorical strategies invite us to experience the pleasures of conspiratorial thinking while reflecting critically on them. But because the Republic conspicuously deflects the question of the characters’ intentions and abilities to implement their political plot—it stresses its ideal (or utopian) quality, it ultimately leaves the question of how to think about the plotting in this plot open. I suggest that this aporetic configuration compels us to consider the salutary critical energies also afforded by a democracy in a conspiratorial mood.

Check out the Facebook and Eventbrite pages for this event. RSVP is recommended as seating is limited, but not required.

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Immortality for All: A Trilogy of Films about Russian Cosmism with Anton Vidokle
Nov
30
7:00 PM19:00

Immortality for All: A Trilogy of Films about Russian Cosmism with Anton Vidokle

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Today the Russian philosophy known as Cosmism has been largely forgotten. Its utopian tenets–combining Western Enlightenment with Eastern philosophy, Russian Orthodox traditions with Marxism–inspired many key Soviet thinkers until they fell victim to Stalinist repression. In this three-part film project, artist Anton Vidokle probes Cosmism’s influence on the twentieth century and suggests its relevance to the present day. This Is Cosmos (2014) returns to the foundations of Cosmist thought, The Communist Revolution Was Caused by the Sun (2015) explores the links between cosmology and politics, and Immortality and Resurrection for All! (2017) restages the museum as a site of resurrection, a central Cosmist idea. Combining essay, documentary, and performance, Vidokle quotes from the writings of Cosmism’s founder Nikolai Fedorov and other philosophers and poets. His wandering camera searches for traces of Cosmist influence in the remains of Soviet-era art, architecture, and engineering, moving from the steppes of Kazakhstan to the museums of Moscow. Music by John Cale and Éliane Radigue accompanies these haunting images, conjuring up the yearning for connectedness, social equality, material transformation, and immortality at the heart of Cosmist thought. 

(Kazakhstan/Germany/Russia/USA, 2014-2017, 96 min., DCP)

Screening 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM in Room 201.

Co-sponsored with the Gray Center, CEERES, and Film Studies.

RSVP on our Eventbrite or Facebook event page.

Anton Vidokle is an artist based in New York and Berlin. As founder of e-flux and e-flux journal, he has produced projects such as the Martha Rosler Library 2005-2006, Pawnshop 2007, unitednationsplaza 2008-09 and Time/Bank 2010. Vidokle’s work has been exhibited internationally at Documenta 13 and the 56th Venice Biennale. His films have been screened at Bergen Assembly; Shanghai Biennale; Istanbul Biennial; Witte de With, Rotterdam; Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw; Berlinale International Film Festival; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Gwangju Biennale; Locarno Festival; and Centre Pompidou, among others.

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3CT Presents Future Café : Human Rights
Nov
27
5:30 PM17:30

3CT Presents Future Café : Human Rights

What is a Future Café? It is an experiment. It is an open-ended conversation. It is a chance to brainstorm and share ideas without evaluation. It is a place to eat cake. Based loosely on both 3CT’s successful Book Salon series and the global Death Café movement, the objective of this new recurring event is to provide opportunity and space for undergraduates to collectively imagine utopian possibilities and long-term futures. 

Under the auspices of the Materializing the Future research project, Professors Shannon Dawdy and Bill Brown facilitate the Future Café, a venue where students in the College can creatively and collaboratively imagine possibilities for the long term. 

"For additional information and links, go to: http://voices.uchicago.edu/futurecafe/ .

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Pavlos Roufos - "A Happy Future is a Thing of the Past"
Nov
19
6:00 PM18:00

Pavlos Roufos - "A Happy Future is a Thing of the Past"

“A careful and penetrating analysis of the cruel torment of Greece, and its background in the emerging global political economy, as the regimented capitalism of the early postwar period, with gains for much of the population, has been subjected to the assault of neoliberal globalization, with grim effects and threatening consequences.” ––Noam Chomsky 

Pavlos Roufos discusses "A Happy Future is a Thing of the Past: The Greek Crisis and other Disasters." He will be joined in conversation by John Clegg. A Q&A and signing will follow the discussion.  

Presented in partnership with the Seminary Co-Op Bookstore.

At the Co-op

About the book: Since 2010, Greece’s social and economic conditions have been irreversibly transformed due to austerity measures imposed by the European troika and successive Greek governments. These stringent restructuring programs were intended to make it possible for Greece to avoid default and improve its debt position, and to reconfigure its economy to escape forever the burden of past structural deficiencies. But things have not gone according to plan. Eight years later, none of these targets have been met. If the programs were doomed to fail from the start, as many claim, what were the real objectives of such devastating austerity? 

In this latest installment in Reaktion's Field Notes series, published in association with the Brooklyn Rail, Pavlos Roufos answers this key question in an insightful, critical analysis of the origins and management of the 2010 Greek economic crisis. Setting the crisis in its historical context, Roufos explores the creation of the Eurozone, its “glorious” years, and today’s political threats to its existence. By interweaving stories of individual people’s lived experiences and describing in detail the politicians, policies, personalities, and events at the heart of the collapse, he situates its development both in terms of the particularities of the Greek economy and society and the overall architecture of Europe’s monetary union. This broad examination also illuminates the social movements that emerged in Greece in response to the crisis, unpacking what both the crisis managers and many of their critics presented as a given: that a happy future is a thing of the past. 

About the author: Pavlos Roufos has been active in Greece’s social movements since the early 1990s and has written on Greece and the economic crisis for the Brooklyn Rail (New York) and Jungle World (Berlin). He has worked as a film editor and is currently doing PhD research on German economic policy at the University of Kassel, Germany. 

About the interlocutor: John Clegg is a Collegiate Assistant Professor in the Social Sciences and Harper-Schmidt Fellow at the University of Chicago.

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Elliott Colla, Does Poetry Incite? Lessons from Egyptian Movement Poetry
Nov
8
4:00 PM16:00

Elliott Colla, Does Poetry Incite? Lessons from Egyptian Movement Poetry

  • Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory (map)
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For decades, poetry has held a central place within leftist social movements in Egypt and has created a canon that includes figures such as Ahmed Fouad Negm and Samir ‘Abd al-Baqi, along with dozens of other movement poets whose names are less known. The modes and functions of movement poetry are multiple: it serves as a privileged idiom of debate and deliberation; it interpellates publics and articulates claims; and it moves people to act. On this last point, Egyptian activists and state security officers have tended to agree historically. Yet even so, when pressed— in court, for instance—to make the case for how poetry incites, their accounts of poetry’s power stumble. This presentation traces the history of movement poetry in modern Egypt, from 1968-2013, and explores the ambiguities of this history by way of incitement cases that were raised against Negm during the 1970s. 

About Elliott Colla
Elliott Colla is the Associate Professor in the Department of Arabic and Islamic Studies at Georgetown University. He is author of Conflicted Antiquities: Egyptology, Egyptomania, Egyptian Modernity (Duke University Press, 2007) and translator of numerous Arabic novels, including Ibrahim Aslan’s The Heron, Ibrahim al-Koni’s Gold Dust, and Raba‘i al-Madhoun’s The Lady from Tel Aviv. The Euston Films/Channel 4 (UK) television adaptation of his novel, Baghdad Central, will appear in August 2019. This talk comes from his current book project, The People Will: Literature and Social Movements in Egypt.

This event will be from 4:00 - 5:30 PM with a reception to follow. 

RSVP encouraged, but not required.

View this event on Eventbrite and/or Facebook.

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Christopher Taylor - "Empire of Neglect" - Adom Getachew
Nov
5
6:00 PM18:00

Christopher Taylor - "Empire of Neglect" - Adom Getachew

Christopher Taylor discusses "Empire of Neglect: The West Indies in the Wake of British Liberalism." He will be joined in conversation by Adom Getachew. A Q&A and signing will follow the discussion.

Presented in partnership with The Seminary Co-op Bookstore

At the Co-op

About the book: Following the publication of Adam Smith’s "The Wealth of Nations," nineteenth-century liberal economic thinkers insisted that a globally hegemonic Britain would profit only by abandoning the formal empire. British West Indians across the divides of race and class understood that, far from signaling an invitation to nationalist independence, this liberal economic discourse inaugurated a policy of imperial “neglect”—a way of ignoring the ties that obligated Britain to sustain the worlds of the empire’s distant fellow subjects. In "Empire of Neglect" Christopher Taylor examines this neglect’s cultural and literary ramifications, tracing how nineteenth-century British West Indians reoriented their affective, cultural, and political worlds toward the Americas as a response to the liberalization of the British Empire. Analyzing a wide array of sources, from plantation correspondence, political economy treatises, and novels to newspapers, socialist programs, and memoirs, Taylor shows how the Americas came to serve as a real and figurative site at which abandoned West Indians sought to imagine and invent postliberal forms of political subjecthood.

About the author: Chris Taylor is an assistant professor of English and the College at the University of Chicago. His first book, "Empire of Neglect: The West Indies in the Wake of British Liberalism," was published by Duke University Press in 2018. He is currently working on a new book project, entitled "The Voluntary Slave: Atlantic Modernity’s Impossible Subject." Chris holds a PhD in English from the University of Pennsylvania and a BA in English from New York University.

About the interlocutor: Adom Getachew is Neubauer Assistant Professor of Political Science and the College at the University of Chicago. Her forthcoming book, "Worldmaking After Empire: The Rise and Fall of Self-Determination," reconstructs an account of self-determination offered in the political thought of Black Atlantic anticolonial nationalists during the height of decolonization in the twentieth century. Adom holds a joint PhD in Political Science and African-American Studies from Yale University and BA in Politics and African-American Studies from the University of Virginia.

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Demetra Kasimis - "The Perpetual Immigrant"
Nov
1
6:00 PM18:00

Demetra Kasimis - "The Perpetual Immigrant"

Demetra Kasimis discusses "The Perpetual Immigrant and the Limits of Athenian Democracy." She will be joined in conversation by Jonathan M. Hall, John P. McCormick, and Josephine McDonagh. A Q&A and signing will follow the discussion.

Presented in partnership with the Seminary Co-Op Bookstore

About the book: In the fifth and fourth centuries BCE, immigrants called 'metics' (metoikoi) settled in Athens without a path to citizenship. Galvanized by these political realities, classical thinkers cast a critical eye on the nativism defining democracy's membership rules and explored the city's anxieties over intermingling and passing. Yet readers continue to treat immigration and citizenship as separate phenomena of little interest to theorists writing at the time. In "The Perpetual Immigrant and the Limits of Athenian Democracy," Demetra Kasimis makes visible the long-overlooked centrality of immigration to the originary practices of democracy and political theory in Athens. She dismantles the interpretive and political assumptions that have led readers to turn away from the metic and reveals the key role this figure plays in such texts as Plato's Republic. The result is a series of original readings that boldly reframes urgent questions about how democracies order their non-citizen members.

About the author: Demetra Kasimis is Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Chicago, where she specializes in democratic theory and the thought and politics of ancient Greece. Her research in political theory has been supported by awards from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council for Learned Societies, and the Fulbright and Mellon Foundations. "The Perpetual Immigrant and the Limits of Athenian Democracy" (Cambridge UP, 2018) is her first book.

About Jonathan M. Hall: Jonathan M. Hall is the author of "Ethnic Identity in Greek Antiquity" (Cambridge, 1997), which received the 1999 Charles J. Goodwin Award for Merit from the American Philological Association; "Hellenicity: Between Ethnicity and Culture" (Chicago, 2002), which was the recipient of the 2004 Gordon J. Laing Award from the University of Chicago Press; "A History of the Archaic Greek World, ca. 1200–479 BCE" (2nd edition: Chichester, 2014); "Artifact and Artifice: Classical Archaeology and the Ancient Historian" (Chicago, 2014); and a series of articles and chapters concerning the political, social, and cultural history of the Greek world. He has taught at the University of Chicago since 1996 and was awarded the Quantrell Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching in 2009.

About John P. McCormick: John P. McCormick is Professor in the Department of Political Science and the College at the University of Chicago. He is the author of several books on the history of political thought and democratic theory, most recently, "Reading Machiavelli" (Princeton University Press, 2018).

About Josephine McDonagh: Josephine McDonagh is Professor in the Department of English Language and Literature, University of Chicago. Before coming to Chicago she taught in a number of universities in Britain and Ireland, most recently University of Oxford and King’s College London. She is author of "De Quincey’s Disciplines" (Oxford University Press, 1994), "George Eliot" (Northcote House, 1997), and "Child Murder and British Culture 1720–1900" (Cambridge University Press, 2003), and has co- edited a number of volumes, most recently (with Joseph Bristow), "Nineteenth-Century Radical Traditions" (Palgrave, 2016) and (with Supriya Chaudhuri, Brian Murray and Rajeswari Sunder Rajan) "Commodities and Culture in the Colonial World" (Routledge, 2018). Her study of literature and migration in the nineteenth century is in process.

RSVP encouraged, but not required. Sign up here.

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3CT Presents Future Café
Oct
30
5:30 PM17:30

3CT Presents Future Café

What is a Future Café? It is an experiment. It is an open-ended conversation. It is a chance to brainstorm and share ideas without evaluation. It is a place to eat cake. Based loosely on both 3CT’s successful Book Salon series and the global Death Café movement, the objective of this new recurring event is to provide opportunity and space for undergraduates to collectively imagine utopian possibilities and long-term futures. 

Under the auspices of the Materializing the Future research project, Professors Shannon Dawdy and Bill Brown facilitate the Future Café, a venue where students in the College can creatively and collaboratively imagine possibilities for the long term. 

"For additional information and links, go to: http://voices.uchicago.edu/futurecafe/ .

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Michel Feher - "Rated Agency" - Jonathan Levy
Oct
26
6:00 PM18:00

Michel Feher - "Rated Agency" - Jonathan Levy

Rated Agency is a must-read for anyone seeking to escape the melancholy of the Trump era by building an effective progressive movement against a creeping dystopia.”—Yanis Varoufakis

Michel Feher discusses "Rated Agency: Investee Politics in a Speculative Age." He will be joined in conversation by Jonathan Levy. A Q&A and signing will follow the discussion.

Presented in partnership with Zone Books and The Seminary Co-op Bookstore.

About the book: The hegemony of finance compels a new orientation for everyone and everything: companies care more about the moods of their shareholders than about longstanding commercial success; governments subordinate citizen welfare to appeasing creditors; and individuals are concerned less with immediate income from labor than appreciation of their capital goods, skills, connections, and reputations.

That firms, states, and people depend more on their ratings than on the product of their activities also changes how capitalism is resisted. For activists, the focus of grievances shifts from the extraction of profit to the conditions under which financial institutions allocate credit. While the exploitation of employees by their employers has hardly been curbed, the power of investors to select investees — to decide who and what is deemed creditworthy — has become a new site of social struggle.

In clear and compelling prose, Michel Feher explains the extraordinary shift in conduct and orientation generated by financialization. Above all, he articulates the new political resistances and aspirations that investees draw from their rated agency.

About the author: Michel Feher, a Belgian philosopher, is the author of "Powerless by Design: The Age of the International Community" and the editor of "Nongovernmental Politics and Europe at a Crossroads," among other titles. Founder of Cette France-là, a monitoring group on French immigration policy, Feher is also a founding editor of Zone Books.

About the interlocutor: Jonathan Levy teaches history at the University of Chicago. He is currently completing a book on the history of American capitalism.

RSVP encouraged but not mandatory, sign-up here

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Silencing the Past @ 25 Symposium
Oct
26
to Oct 27

Silencing the Past @ 25 Symposium

  • Regenstein Library Room 122 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The year 2020 will mark the 25th anniversary of the publication of Michel-
Rolph Trouillot’s seminal text, Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History. This conference will use the occasion of this anniversary to reflect both on the continued importance and afterlife of Silencing the Past (STP) and on
its relationship to Trouillot’s larger oeuvre. Proceedings from the conference
will be published as a volume in 2020.

CONVENED BY: YARIMAR BONILLA, MAYANTHI FERNANDO, GREG BECKETT & FRANCOIS RICHARD.

Schedule:

Oct 26: 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Oct 27: 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM

For the full conference schedule and more information visit: www.silencingthepast25.com

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The Outlook for Democracy In Brazil
Oct
25
5:00 PM17:00

The Outlook for Democracy In Brazil

  • Social Science Research Building Room 122 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Brazil, the world's fourth largest democracy, is on the verge of electing a president with a proudly authoritarian agenda. If Jair Bolsonaro is elected on October 28, what does this mean for democracy in Brazil and elsewhere?

Panelists:

  • Brodwyn Fischer, History and Latin American Studies

  • Yanilda María González, Social Service Administration

  • Benjamin Lessing, Political Science

  • Andreas Glaeser, Sociology (Moderator)

RSVP via Eventbrite.

ORGANIZED BY:

  • THE CENTER FOR LATIN AMERICAN STUDI ES

  • THE CHICAGO CENTER ON DEMOCRACY

  • THE CHICAGO CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY THEORY

  • THE PROGRAM ON POLITICAL VIOLENCE AT C POST

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Robert Meister, Historial Justice in the Age of Finance
Oct
18
4:00 PM16:00

Robert Meister, Historial Justice in the Age of Finance

  • Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Historical Justice in the Age of Finance is a sequel to After Evil, arguing that injustice, not merely trauma, is the aftermath of evil and presenting an historical account of democratic politics a the extraction of a price for rolling over the option of justice now.  To make this case, I connect a Marx-inflected language of historical justice to the technical language of valuing financial options. and show that historical justice is itself an option that has value today even though it is not an option that can presently be exercised. In summary form, my argument is that political democracy in an age of finance is best understood as a project of increasing and realizing the present value of historical justice as an option in non-revolutionary conjunctures. Political democracy can do this, because within contemporary global finance capital market liquidity is inherently at risk. Through acritical appropriation of the language and practices of financialization, progressive movements can leverage finance’s theoretical reduction of class power to an absence of political risk in capital markets by introducing a political risk that the state will not restore liquidity to capital markets. I argue that the liquidity guarantee that the state provides in such situations, most recently in 2008, can be priced using options theory--and that this is the political premium available to fund greater justice that can be extracted for allowing the cumulative gains from past injustice to remain.

About Robert Meister

Professor Meister is 3CT’s visiting scholar. A professor of social and political thought in the department of the History of Consciousness at UC Santa Cruz, Meister’s research interests include political and moral philosophy, law and social theory, Marxian theory, institutional analysis, and financialization. His most recent book is After Evil: A Politics of Human Rights(Columbia University Press, 2011). His essay, “Liquidity”, in Derivatives and Wealth of Society (University of Chicago Press, 2016) will be part of the new book.

Event starts at 4:00 with a reception to follow. View this event on Eventbrite and Facebook. RSVP on Eventbrite encouraged, but not required.

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