New Book Salon: "The Theater Of Operations: National Security Affect From The Cold War to The War On Terror" // Joseph Masco

  • Wilder House 5811 S Kenwood Ave Chicago, IL, 60637 United States

Description

University of Chicago Professor Joseph Masco presents his latest book, The Theater of Operations: National Security Affect from the Cold War to the War on Terror, with commentary provided by Professor Michael Rossi from the Department of History.  Professor Masco asks the question: how did the most powerful nation on earth come to embrace terror as the organizing principle of its security policy? He locates the origins of the present-day U.S. counterterrorism apparatus in the Cold War's "balance of terror." Professor Masco shows how, after the attacks of 9/11, the U.S. global War on Terror mobilized a wide range of affective, conceptual, and institutional resources established during the Cold War to enable a new planetary theater of operations. Tracing how specific aspects of emotional management, existential danger, state secrecy, and threat awareness have evolved as core aspects of the American social contract, Masco draws on archival, media, and ethnographic resources to offer a new portrait of American national security culture. Undemocratic and unrelenting, this counterterror state prioritizes speculative practices over facts, and ignores everyday forms of violence across climate, capital, and health in an unprecedented effort to anticipate and eliminate terror threats—real, imagined, and emergent.

Refreshments will be provided. Event is free and open to the public.  If you need assistance to attend, please contact jhanchar@uchicago.edu

Bio

(PhD, UC San Diego 1999) Professor of Anthropology and of the Social Sciences in the College writes and teaches courses on science and technology, U.S. national security culture, political ecology, mass media, and critical theory. He is the author of The Nuclear Borderlands: The Manhattan Project in Post-Cold War New Mexico (Princeton University Press, 2006), which won the 2008 Rachel Carson Prize from the Society for the Social Studies of Science and the 2006 Robert K. Merton Prize from the Section on Science, Knowledge and Technology of the American Sociology Association. His work as been supported by the American Council of Learned Societies, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, The Wenner-Gren Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities. His current work examines the evolution of the national security state in the United States, with a particular focus on the interplay between affect, technology, and threat perception within a national public sphere.